Stop Punishing Businesses for Making Money

We need to change the tax code to stop punishing revenue generating businesses.
For 75 years now, corporate profit over their total value has been decreasing. That means corporations are really good at accumulating money, but increasingly worse at deploying that money. At making money with money. This is really serious.
Pharmaceutical companies don’t know how to make drugs, they only know to acquire companies that do. Google even, is no longer a technology company. Google became Alphabet. It’s a holding company…. They might as well be Goldman Sachs…. They don’t know how to create value.
They are using a bankrupt method. They are using a 13th Century corporate operating system to run digitally-enabled businesses…. That model is obsolete…. It was based on going to South American and enslaving people and taking their precious metals. It doesn’t work for a digital economy.
America needs us all. And we all depend on each other.
New York’s 16th Congressional District

Terrance Jackson for Congress

Democracy is based on citizens caring about and taking responsibility for both themselves as for the well-being of all.

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Terrance Jackson for Congress

The law needs legitimacy in domestic & foreign policies.
New York’s 13th Congressional District

tj 4 congress intl

When the law is applied in the absence of legitimacy, it does not produce obedience. It produces the opposite. It leads to backlash.

Terrance Jackson for Congress
malesinc

Putting It All TogetherIn 1991, Terrance Jackson wrote Putting It All Together addressing mass incarceration as government policy. He endured people calling him crazy and an “conspiracy theorist.” 24 years later, mass incarceration as government policy is common knowledge. We need representation that will be proactive and not reactive.

Ed Burns

It’s not a war on drugs. Don’t ever think it’s a war on drugs. It’s a war on the Blacks. It started as a war on the Blacks, it’s now spread to Hispanics and poor Whites. But initially it was a war on Blacks. And it was designed basically to take that energy that was coming out of the Civil Rights Movement and destroy it.
~ Ed Burns
Co-creator of “The Wire”

HSBC

According to an article by Avinash Tharoor, Bank of America, Western Union, and JP Morgan, are among the institutions allegedly involved in the drug trade. Meanwhile, HSBC has admitted its laundering role, and evaded criminal prosecution by paying a fine of almost $2 billion. The lack of imprisonment of any bankers involved is indicative of the hypocritical nature of the drug war; an individual selling a few grams of drugs can face decades in prison, while a group of people that tacitly allow — and profit from — the trade of tons, escape incarceration.
According to the Corporate Crime Reporter:
Corporate crime inflicts far more damage on society than all street crime combined.Whether in bodies or injuries or dollars lost, corporate crime and violence wins by a landslide.
The FBI estimates, for example, that burglary and robbery – street crimes – costs the nation $3.8 billion a year.
The losses from a handful of major corporate frauds – Tyco, Adelphia, Worldcom, Enron – swamp the losses from all street robberies and burglaries combined.
Health care fraud alone costs Americans $100 billion to $400 billion a year.
The savings and loan fraud – which former Attorney General Dick Thornburgh called “the biggest white collar swindle in history” – cost us anywhere from $300 billion to $500 billion.
David Simon

David Simon, co-creator of HBO’s “The Wire”

The factories are not going to be here anymore. We don’t need these people so the least we can do is hunt them. And when we hurt them we at least provide jobs for cops, DEA agents, lawyers and prison guards.
~ David Simon
Co-creator of HBO’s The Wire

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Small Businesses and Startups Are Keys to Our Future

small-biz

According to a report by American Express OPEN:

Neighborhoods with thriving independent businesses saw home values outperform citywide markets by 50 percent over the last 14 years.

In the New York Metro area, the average home value would have increased 176% or $291,672 to $457,672 from 1997 to 2011 if it was located near a successful independent business district.
And according to a national study by sociologists at LSU and Baylor University:
Counties and parishes with a greater concentration of small, locally-owned businesses have healthier populations — with lower rates of mortality, obesity and diabetes — than do those that rely on large companies with “absentee” owners.
So if you live in a neighborhood with thriving independent businesses, chances are your home is worth more and you are healthier than if you lived in neighborhood without thriving independent businesses.

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