Where Are the Black and Brown Mark Zuckerbergs?

Chess in the Park
Saturday, September 30th – Morningside Park
Monday, October 9th – New Rochelle, NY [Columbus Day]
Want Your Children to Succeed?

Billionaire chess

Where are the black and brown Mark Zuckerbergs? That was essentially the question — the challenge — that the late musician Prince asked Van Jones, civil rights activist, founder of the Dream Corps, and host of CNN’s The Messy Truth with Van Jones.

Prince Van Jones

What we need to understand is that when Mark Zuckerberg was about eleven, his parents hired a computer tutor, a software developer named David Newman, who came to the house once a week to work with Mark. “He was a prodigy,” Newman told The New Yorker writer Jose Antonio Vargasme. “Sometimes it was tough to stay ahead of him.” (Newman lost track of Zuckerberg and was stunned when he learned from the interview that his former pupil had built Facebook.) Soon thereafter, Mark started taking a graduate computer course every Thursday night at nearby Mercy College.

Mark Zuckerberg
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Want Your Children to Succeed?

Teach Them Chess & Computer Programming!
Top 5 Billionaires

According to studies:
  • Chess boosts brain power in kids.
  • Chess improves IQ.
  • Chess enhances arithmetical skills.
  • Chess hones verbal skills.
  • Chess sharpens critical thinking skills.
  • Chess boosts emotional intelligence and psycho-social skills.
Bill Gates, Albert Einstein, William Shakespeare, Napoleon Bonaparte, Winston Churchill, Will Smith, Bono, and Madonna were or are avid chess players. Tennis legend and six-time Grand Slam singles champion Boris Becker said:
“I used to prepare for my tennis matches by playing chess, and it would get my mind stimulated and focused before going on court. It was essentially a mental warm-up.”

Bezos, Obama, Zuckerberg, and Gates playing chess

And learning computer programming has never been more important. According to Douglas Rushkoff, author of Program or Be Programmed:
When human beings acquired language, we learned not just how to listen but how to speak. When we gained literacy, we learned not just how to read but how to write. And as we move into an increasingly digital reality, we must learn not just how to use programs but how to make them. In the emerging, highly programmed landscape ahead, you will either create the software or you will be the software. It’s really that simple: Program, or be programmed.
Zuckerber & Carlsen

Co-founder, Chairman, and CEO of Facebook Mark Zuckerberg playing World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen. As of March 27, 2017, Facebook stock is trading at $139 per share which makes Zuckerberg’s stake worth $58.6 billion.

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Chess: The Immortal Game, An Interview with David Shenk

David Shenk

David Shenk

We are conducting interviews for our upcoming documentary addressing inequity called I Could Be….
David Shenk is the award-winning and national-bestselling author of six books, including The Genius in All of Us (“deeply interesting and important” – New York Times), The Forgetting (“remarkable” – Los Angeles Times), Data Smog (“indispensable” – New York Times), andThe Immortal Game (“superb” – Wall Street Journal). He is a popular lecturer, a short-film director/producer, and a contributor to National Geographic, Slate, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Gourmet, Harper’s, Spy, The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New Republic, The American Scholar, The Huffington Post, NPR, BBC and PBS. Shenk lives in Brooklyn.
What inspired you to write a book on the history of chess?
A couple of small events connected to chess came together to make me especially curious about the game and its history. One was Ricky Jay’s demonstration of the knight tour, which fascinated me. Another was an episode of the TV show The West Wing where the President brings back old chess sets from India, talks about how old the game is, and uses it as a metaphor for a contemporary stand-off with China. Like a lot of people, I had thought chess was a medieval European game, maybe 500 years old. To find out that it was 1500 years old opened my eyes and made me wonder what other games have continously lived so long and impacted so many different cultures. The answer is none. Chess is something unique in the history of humankind and my hunch was that a close look at its history could provide a unique understanding of human culture. So the shorter answer is that I wrote a book about the history of chess in order to learn more about who humans are.

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Want Your Children To Succeed?

Teach Them Chess & Computer Programming!

Magnus Carlsen and Bill Gates

World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen playing second wealthiest person according to Forbes, Microsoft Co-founder and Chairman Bill Gates.

We are working on a summer program in New Rochelle to teach chess and computer programming. We are also looking to give out $40 tablets, and set up free WiFi.

According to studies:

  • Chess boosts brain power in kids.
  • Chess improves IQ.
  • Chess enhances arithmetical skills.
  • Chess hones verbal skills.
  • Chess sharpens critical thinking skills.
  • Chess boosts emotional intelligence and psycho-social skills.

Bill Gates, Albert Einstein, William Shakespeare, Napoleon Bonaparte, Winston Churchill, Will Smith, Bono, and Madonna were or are avid chess players. Tennis legend and six-time Grand Slam singles champion Boris Becker said:

“I used to prepare for my tennis matches by playing chess, and it would get my mind stimulated and focused before going on court. It was essentially a mental warm-up.”

In an interview with The Harvard Business Review, former World Chess Champion Garry Kasparov said:

There is nothing cute or charming about chess; it is a violent sport, and when you confront your opponent you set out to crush his ego. The world chess masters with whom I have competed over the years nearly all share my belief that chess is a battleground on which the enemy has to be vanquished. This is what it means to be a chess player, and I cannot imagine that it is very different from what it takes to be a top-ranked CEO.

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