Blockchain: Nobody Really Understands

While there is a great deal of corporate and venture capital investment in blockchain technology, there is also still plenty of room for tinkerers to have big impacts.
Humans are far better at doing than understanding and better at tinkering than inventing.

Money raised by ICO

According to Coinschedule, so far this year, more than $3 billion has been raised via ICOs or Initial Coin Offerings, yet the ICO was created by J. R. Willett, a guy you probably never heard of.
Blockchain is the underlying technology behind cryptocurrencies like bitcoin. But it is also being developed for use in a variety of industries from finance to insurance, promising cheaper and faster processes.
In 2009, bitcoin was quietly launch by Satoshi Nakamoto, maybe as an experiment to show the world it was possible to create a secure and private means to send money between people without the need of a trusted third party (e.g. Visa or PayPal). No one knows the true identity of Nakamoto, but people do know that a single bitcoin is valued at over $5,600, with a total market cap of over $90B. Bitcoin is a cryptocurrency and companies who help people purchase bitcoins with real dollars are wallets. Wallets are regulated as money transmitters; bitcoin is money. People who profit from selling their Bitcoins pay taxes to the IRS. Bitcoin is real and it’s growing at unprecedented rates.
Through 2009 and early 2010, bitcoins had no value at all, and for the first six months after they started trading in April 2010, the value of one bitcoin stayed below 14 cents. Then, as the currency gained viral traction in summer 2010, rising demand for a limited supply caused the price on online exchanges to start moving. By early November, it surged to 36 cents before settling down to around 29 cents. In February 2011, it rose again and was mentioned on Slashdot for achieving “dollar parity”; it hit $1.06 before settling in at roughly 87 cents.
You can’t possibly get a good technology going without an enormous number of failures.
A few years ago, a new concept emerged called the Initial Coin Offering or ICO. ICOs are a way for new cryptocurrencies or coins to raise capital in an online offering. The logic behind ICOs is that companies who create new cryptocurrencies do not want to give it away for free, hoping people use it and put a value on it. If these are currencies, then a value must be put on it. This is what an ICO does. It allows a person or a company to sell a set number of coins or tokens to others in exchange for bitcoin or some other well-recognized cryptocurrency (ie: ether). An ICO is similar in many ways to an IPO. In an IPO, a company goes public and issues shares. In an ICO, a company issues a limited number of their own coins.

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Random Collisions: The Documentary

How did America—a country dedicated to the proposition that all people are created equal—become one of the most unequal countries on the planet?

Random Collisions: The Documentary.

Wednesday, June 6, 2018 & Thursday, June 7, 2018
“The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly.”
John 10:10

Nas Coinbase

Is the Blockchain a technology of abundance?

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Robotic Chess on the Ethereum Blockchain

We are introducing students to artificial intelligence (A.I.), computer vision, data science, machine learning, robotics and blockchain technology.

Zaleik and Julian programming the Raspberry Pi

New York Times picture

Nearly all big tech companies have an artificial intelligence project, and they are willing to pay experts millions of dollars to help get it done.
Tech’s biggest companies are placing huge bets on artificial intelligence, banking on things ranging from face-scanning smartphones and conversational coffee-table gadgets to computerized health care and autonomous vehicles. As they chase this future, they are doling out salaries that are startling even in an industry that has never been shy about lavishing a fortune on its top talent.

Typical A.I. specialists, including both Ph.D.s fresh out of school and people with less education and just a few years of experience, can be paid from $300,000 to $500,000 a year or more in salary and company stock, according to nine people who work for major tech companies or have entertained job offers from them. All of them requested anonymity because they did not want to damage their professional prospects.

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Financial Health for Everyone: Faith-Based Cards

Random Collisions New York

Random Collisions are forums for the random collision of ideas. Jane Jacobs in The Economy of Cities offered the random collision of ideas as an explanation for the success of cities such as New York.
Wednesday, June 6, 2018 & Thursday, June 7, 2018

Faith-Based Card

It’s a sad truth of American life that the poorer you are the more you pay for banking.
All churches want to save their parishioners’ souls. The Church of God Credit Union wants to save their money, too.
“Sometimes people of the congregation needed financial help as well as spiritual help,” explains LeAne Cloud, president of the Wichita, Kan.-based institution.
The Church of God Credit Union is one of a growing number of faith-based credit unions around the country, created to help members and people in need. There are roughly 500 around the nation, set up in church basements and donated office space, and staffed mostly by volunteers. Most, but not all, are affiliated with churches in low-income neighborhoods.
Faith-based credit unions are run independently of their parent churches, however, and are federally chartered and monitored just like thousands of other, more traditional, credit unions. As a group, they have more than $2 billion in assets.
They represent a variety of faiths and denominations, including Protestant, Catholic and Muslim, officials with the National Credit Union Administration say.

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Blockchain for Remittance at Random Collisions

Random Collisions Becoming a Billionaire

We will be exploring the concept of using Blockchain technology for remittance at Random Collisions New York
Random Collisions are forums for the random collision of ideas. Jane Jacobs in The Economy of Cities offered the random collision of ideas as an explanation for the success of cities such as New York.
Random Collisions New York
Wednesday, June 6, 2018 & Thursday, June 7, 2018
Random Collisions Silicon Valley – September 2018
Random Collisions Los Angeles – January 2019
Random Collisions Lagos – Spring 2019
Random Collisions Bangalore – Fall 2019
“Millennials are on track to be the least entrepreneurial generation in recent history.”
American innovation may be suffering from the fact that Americans today have less exposure to ideas outside the realm of their own experience.


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Bitcoins & Blockchains with Cisco’s Robert Greenfield IV

Robert T. Greenfield IV

Robert Thomas Greenfield IV is a software engineer at Cisco. He is also a Certified Bitcoin Professional and the Blockchain Curriculum Lead at StreetCode Academy. He graduated from the University of Michigan with a BS in Industrial Engineering and is a director at the African American Community Services Agency. We are both members of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Visit his website at robtg4.co.

Terrance Jackson: Bitcoin which is a cryptocurrency or digital currency based on blockchain technology. It has tripled its value since the beginning of the year. What exactly are bitcoins and blockchains?
Robert Greenfield IV: “Bitcoin” is the blockchain environment and broader development community that supports the transactions of “bitcoin” or “BTC,” which is the digital currency that introduced Blockchain technology to the world and solved the problem of “double spending,” or copying digital money. The terminology is commonly mixed up in broader conversations around speculative investment and technology.

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