Blockchain to Reverse Climate Change & Diabetes

We are researching Blockchain applications for Urban Agriculture.
“Food is key to nearly everything,” solutions for food production will actually come from cities, and blockchain technology will be critical in developing those solutions.
[T]he issues that confront most Americans directly are income, food (thereby, agriculture), health and climate change. (And, of course, war, but let’s leave that aside for now.)

Mark Bittman

These are all related: You can’t address climate change without fixing agriculture, you can’t fix health without improving diet, you can’t improve diet without addressing income, and so on. The production, marketing and consumption of food is key to nearly everything. (It’s one of the keys to war, too, because large-scale agriculture is dependent on control of global land, oil, minerals and water.)

Jane Jacobs - The Economy of Cities

“Food is key to nearly everything” and the solutions for food production will actually come from cities. As Jane Jacobs wrote in The Economy of Cities:
Current theory in many fields—economics, history, anthropology—assumes that cities are built upon a rural economic base. If my observations and reasoning are correct, the reverse is true: that is, rural economics, including agricultural work, are directly built upon city economics and city work.
Jacobs theorized that cities predated agriculture. She is probably wrong on that particular premise, but she was pointing to a deeper truth, as a Planetizen article notes:
[D]espite the “total fallacy” of Jacobs’s statement that cities came first, she had a valid point when she stated that agricultural development benefited from urban stimuli. Monica Smith also notes that the Cities First model “requires modifications but still contains an element of truth in that cities provide significant boosts to rural productivity” by promoting certain efficiencies of cultivation….
I support… the archaeological consensus on the relationship between agriculture and urban origins. At best, agriculture and cities evolved hand-in-hand in what Soja describes as a “mutually causal and symbiotic relationship.” But perhaps there’s still something to the idea of Cities First if we focus on cities not as things (or, products) but as processes.
Solutions for food production will come from cities, and blockchain technology will be critical in developing those solutions.
Blockchain technology came to popular notice with the rise of bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. The technology allows for highly secure digital transactions and recordkeeping. Even though blockchain found its first use in cryptocurrencies, the concept can be applied to all sorts of transactions, including agricultural ones.

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The Peebles Card: Financial Health & Good Jobs

The Peebles Card

It’s a sad truth of American life that the poorer you are the more you pay for banking.
For example, according to the Wall Street Journal, banks and other financial firms in 2016 generated $33 billion in fees related to overdrafts on checking accounts, this is the highest level in seven years. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has compared overdraft fees to a short-term loan with a 17,000% APR!
Mehrsa Baradaran, associate professor of law at the University of Georgia, and author of How the Other Half Banks, writes “As the banks are set up currently, the fees they charge are meant to dissuade small accounts, or accounts by people whose incomes are minimal and very uneven.”
As Baradaran writes in her book’s introduction, the banking industry has stopped serving those who are “too poor to bank”, pushing them into the arms of non-bank service providers to provide the most basic services: to cash pay checks, pay bills or transfer money. In exchange, she calculates that they fork over up to 10% of their income for these services.
In some cases, they don’t have an option: a bank may refuse to open an account for them. And banks have long been trying to “discourage” their smaller customers: fees on accounts where balances dip below a specified level even briefly can look extremely costly to a low-income household.

Financial Health

Financial Health for Everyone
Our vision is an audacious one: to increase the number of individuals with positive financial health and well-being. To achieve financial health, people need day-to-day financial systems that build long-term resilience and opportunity. Financial health enables family stability, education, and upward mobility, not just for individuals today but across future generations. Promoting financial health is good for the American economy. Financially healthy consumers drive new opportunities for increased engagement, loyalty, and long-term revenue streams. Lasting financial health also has a positive macroeconomic impact on communities at local, regional, and national levels.

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New Rochelle Magazine: Digital Ads Suck & Google is an Old Business

The new model of advertising and branding demands that companies improve public life and satisfy the needs of our higher sacred selves.
New Rochelle Magazine will be mailed to property owners with properties valued over $1 million, such as:
Gregory Hawkins
Sharon  Hawkins
20 Premium Point Rd
Rochelle, NY 10801
FULL MARKET VALUE
$3,290,210
Property Taxes 2016
School $72,354.81
City $20,085.58
County $16,694.10
Cyrus Noshir Pardiwala
Kimberly Willoc Pardiwala
27 Dogwood Ln
Larchmont, NY 10538
FULL MARKET VALUE
$1,101,399
Property Taxes 2016
School $24,220.79
City $6,879.99
County $5,588.36
Dr. Paula Rothaus
19 Pryor Manor Rd
Larchmont, NY 10538
FULL MARKET VALUE
$1,905,594
Property Taxes 2016
School $41,905.81
City $11,731.88
County $9,668.74
Donald Gallagher
Raymonde Gallagher
78 Seaview Ave
New Rochelle, NY 10801
FULL MARKET VALUE
$1,038,462
Property Taxes 2016
School $21,628.78
City $6,166.55
County $5,087.49
Reducing Property Taxes & Reforming Education
Why should the residents of New Rochelle pay extremely high property taxes to maintain a system that destroys the creativity of our children?
In 2016, Westchester County ranked first in the nation in property taxes. Westchester residents paid on average $16,500 a year in property taxes, according to a report from ATTOM Data Solutions. High taxes are undermining the Westchester economy. If you were a company trying to find a location for a new office or distribution center, why would you come to the highest taxed county in the United States?
We pay outrageous property taxes, yet our children are vastly underserved by schools. Our schools were designed in the late 19th Century and early 20th Century to create the cogs of the Industrial Age, jobs such as factory workers and bureaucrats. Schools do not value creativity and entrepreneurship, the types of skills that are needed in the 21st Century.

Click images for draft of New Rochelle Magazine

New Rochelle Magazine
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Blockchain for Remittance at Random Collisions

Random Collisions Becoming a Billionaire

We will be exploring the concept of using Blockchain technology for remittance at Random Collisions New York
Random Collisions are forums for the random collision of ideas. Jane Jacobs in The Economy of Cities offered the random collision of ideas as an explanation for the success of cities such as New York.
Random Collisions New York
Wednesday, June 6, 2018 & Thursday, June 7, 2018
Random Collisions Silicon Valley – September 2018
Random Collisions Los Angeles – January 2019
Random Collisions Lagos – Spring 2019
Random Collisions Bangalore – Fall 2019
“Millennials are on track to be the least entrepreneurial generation in recent history.”
American innovation may be suffering from the fact that Americans today have less exposure to ideas outside the realm of their own experience.


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Bitcoins & Blockchains with Cisco’s Robert Greenfield IV

Robert T. Greenfield IV

Robert Thomas Greenfield IV is a software engineer at Cisco. He is also a Certified Bitcoin Professional and the Blockchain Curriculum Lead at StreetCode Academy. He graduated from the University of Michigan with a BS in Industrial Engineering and is a director at the African American Community Services Agency. We are both members of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Visit his website at robtg4.co.

Terrance Jackson: Bitcoin which is a cryptocurrency or digital currency based on blockchain technology. It has tripled its value since the beginning of the year. What exactly are bitcoins and blockchains?
Robert Greenfield IV: “Bitcoin” is the blockchain environment and broader development community that supports the transactions of “bitcoin” or “BTC,” which is the digital currency that introduced Blockchain technology to the world and solved the problem of “double spending,” or copying digital money. The terminology is commonly mixed up in broader conversations around speculative investment and technology.

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Reverse Engineering a Startup

Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus by Douglas Rushkoff

The following story of “Ruby” reverse engineering a startup based on market conditions, industry trends, and nascent investor fads is taken from Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus by Douglas Rushkoff.
One of the smartest technologists I know, a young woman from the West Coast I’ll call Ruby, decided to launch a company on a whim. Ruby did exhaustive research on emerging interests and keywords in the technology and business press, as well as conference topics and TED subjects. What were venture capitalists getting interested in? Moreover, what sorts of technical skills would be valuable to those industries? For instance, if she concluded that big data was in ascendance, then she would not only launch a startup related to big data but also make sure she created competencies that big data firms required, such as data visualization or factor analysis. This way, even if her company’s primary offering failed, it would still be valuable as an acquisition—for either its skills or its talent, which would be in high demand if her bet on the growing sector proved correct.
She ultimately chose geolocation services as the growing field. She assembled teams to build a few apps that depended on geolocation—less because the apps themselves were terrific (though she wouldn’t complain if one became a hit) than because of the capabilities those apps could offer to potential acquirers. Working on them also forced her team to develop marketable competencies as well as a handful of patentable solutions in a growing field with many problems to solve. The company was purchased, for a whole lot, by a much larger technology player looking to incorporate geolocation into its software and platforms. The employees, founder, and inventors who believed in her are now all wealthy people.
E-commerce using Elasticsearch
And Machine Learing
Last night, I attended an Elastic meetup hosted by HBC Digital. The Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) owns Saks Fifth Avenue and Lord & Taylor. This meetup provided one of those “aha” moments. It is possible to build a local search engine using elasticsearch. This search engine would incorporate e-commerce and machine learning.

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Closing The Achievement Gap

The Forgotten Female Programmers Who Created Modern Tech

Hidden Figures

Mary Jackson

Mary Jackson grew up in Hampton, Virginia. After graduating with highest honors from high school, she then continued her education at Hampton Institute, earning her Bachelor of Science Degrees in Mathematics and Physical Science. Following graduation, Mary taught in Maryland prior to joining NASA. Mary retired from the NASA Langley Research Center in 1985 as an Aeronautical Engineer after 34 years.
Credits: NASA

Decades ago, women pioneered computer programming — but too often, that’s a part of history that even the smartest people don’t know. There is more about the pioneering women of computer programming below.
The Achievement Gap
For decades, educators have struggled to close the “achievement gap,” the persistent differences in test scores, grades and graduation rates among students of different races, ethnicities and, in some subjects, genders.
When it comes to technology skills, the U.S. comes in last place — right below Poland. In addition, there was a significant racial difference with non-whites scoring below whites.

The Genius Farm

We taught a class in Larchmont on Unity programming.
Psychologists are finding evidence that short, simple interventions can make a surprisingly large difference. Terrance Jackson, the publisher of Pistis, adopted some of these simple interventions in a class called “Creating Computer Games with Terrance Jackson” that was offered to local 5th-8th graders at Larchmont Library. The game that they created using the Unity game engine is below. Pokémon Go uses Unity. We are looking to expand this program.
Roll-a-Ball

Roll-a-Ball

Click here to play.

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