Fundraiser to Reverse Climate Change, Diabetes, and Unemployment

We are having a t-shirt fundraiser to reverse Climate Change, Diabetes, and Unemployment with our Prayer Breakfast and Genius Farm.
Our t-shirt design

Pieta t-shirt

By local artist and librarian Roxanne Mapp

Roxanne Mapp

Don’t try to interpret faith in terms of science and logic. Religious imagery is telling you what is becoming.

"Miracles happen" ~ Pope Francis

“And all things you ask in prayer, believing, you will receive.”
Matthew 21:22
Our t-shirts are:
  • Grown in the USA
  • Certified organic cotton
  • Made in the Carolinas
  • Transparent supply chain
  • Water-based inks
  • Environmentally-friendly print process
  • Medium weight: 5.4 oz
Be proud each and every day you wear your tee knowing that your purchase supports more than 500 American jobs! Since it’s made from super-comfortable ringspun cotton, you’ll want to wear it every day. And because it’s made from a medium weight (5.4 oz) fabric that’s constructed for durability, you can actually wear it every day without it showing signs of wear.
Ask, and it will be given to you;
Seek, and you will find;
Knock, and it will be opened to you.
~ Matthew 7:7

Seven Magazine - A R Bernard

Click, and it will be opened to you.
Click the image above or below for a rough draft of Seven Magazine.

T-shirt fundraiser
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Rethinking School Lunch

Why Real School Food?

The City School District of New Rochelle (NY) and the Mamaroneck Union Free School District (NY) have contracts with Aramark.

Aramark at Kauffman Stadium

There is a better way!
We can train local people to feed our school children healthy meals.
At DC Central Kitchen, they have prepared nearly 6,300 healthy, scratch-cooked breakfasts, lunches, and suppers each day for children at 10 public and private schools in Washington, DC.  They are proving that healthy, scratch-cooked meals can be enjoyable for children, affordable for school districts, and valuable for teachers who need children to be nourished and focused.
The Obamas at DCCK

President Barack Obama checks in on First Lady Michelle Obama and daughters Sasha and Malia as they prepare burritos while volunteering at the DC Central Kitchen in Washington, D.C., on Martin Luther King Day

Click image for interview with Robert Egger, founder of DCCK.

Let’s replicate what is being done at DC Central Kitchen.

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Genius Farm: Crazy Enough To Change The World

Here’s to the crazy ones. The rebels. The troublemakers. The ones who see things differently. While some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.

Crazy Enough to Change the World

The Achievement Gap
For decades, educators have struggled to close the “achievement gap,” the persistent differences in test scores, grades and graduation rates among students of different races, ethnicities and, in some subjects, genders.
According to an American Psychological Association article, a group of social and cognitive psychologists have approach this problem not based on the idea that at least some of these disparities are the result of faulty teaching or broken school systems, but instead spring from toxic stereotypes that cause ethnic-minority and other students such as women to question whether they belong in school and whether they can do well there. While such a major problem might seem to require widespread social change to fix, the psychologists are finding evidence that short, simple interventions can make a surprisingly large difference.
Sofia, Judit, Klara, and Susan Polgar

Sofia, Judit, Klara, and Susan Polgar

We have the example of the Polgar sisters. László Polgar believes that geniuses are made not born. Before he had children, he wrote a book called Bring Up Genius! He and his wife Klara raised their three daughters, Susan, Sofia, and Judit, according to the precepts outlined in the book.

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Genius Farm: Reversing Diabetes, Unemployment & Climate Change

In March, Terrance Jackson did a presentation:
Genius Farm
Teaching young people to grow food for their communities and solve the critical problems of our times.

We will begin at the Genius Farm by building personal food computers based on the work of the MIT Media Lab’s Open Agriculture Initiative. The OpenAg Initiative is developing open source “Food Computers.” A Food Computer is a controlled-environment agriculture technology platform that uses robotic systems to control and monitor climate, energy, and plant growth inside of a specialized growing chamber. Climate variables such as carbon dioxide, air temperature, humidity, dissolved oxygen, potential hydrogen, electrical conductivity, and root-zone temperature are among the many conditions that can be controlled and monitored within the growing chamber.
Personal Food Computer

Caleb Harper, Director of MIT’s Open Agriculture Initiative, demonstrating a personal food computer and showing students how controlled environment plant-growing works.

Genius Farm introduces students to the importance of both growing food and programming computers.

comp sci
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Genius Farm as a Cure for Violence

In March, Terrance Jackson did a presentation:
Genius Farm
Teaching young people to grow food for their communities and solve the critical problems of our times.

Personal Food Computer

Caleb Harper, Director of MIT’s Open Agriculture Initiative, showing students how controlled environment plant-growing works.

We will begin at the Genius Farm by building personal food computers based on the work of the MIT Media Lab’s Open Agriculture Initiative. The OpenAg Initiative is developing open source “Food Computers.” A Food Computer is a controlled-environment agriculture technology platform that uses robotic systems to control and monitor climate, energy, and plant growth inside of a specialized growing chamber. Climate variables such as carbon dioxide, air temperature, humidity, dissolved oxygen, potential hydrogen, electrical conductivity, and root-zone temperature are among the many conditions that can be controlled and monitored within the growing chamber.
Will Allen of Growing Power

Will Allen of Growing Power

According to Will Allen’s The Good Food Revolution:
The great tragedy for many African Americans…is that in losing touch with the land and with traditions handed down for generations, they also lost an important set of skills: how to grow and prepare healthy food….
It’s no coincidence that the epidemic of diet-related illnesses now sweeping the country—obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, strokes—are harming blacks the most….

comp sci

The Food Computer is a way to introduce students to the importance of both growing food and programming computers.

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Reversing Diabetes, Unemployment & Climate Change

Karen Washington speaking

Karen Washington is the co-founder of Rise & Root Farm in Orange County, NY, and a board member of the New York Botanical Gardens. She has spent decades promoting urban farming as a way for all New Yorkers to access to fresh, locally grown food.
Building Communities Through Urban Agriculture
Wednesday, June 1st at 6:30 pm
500 Main Church Street, New Rochelle, NY 10801
Karen Washington and Michelle Obama

Karen Washington, left, receives a 2010 National Medal for Museum and Library Service along with Gregory Long, director of the New York Botanical Garden, from First Lady Michelle Obama at the White House

As a member of the La Familia Verde Community Garden Coalition, she helped launched a City Farms Market, bringing garden fresh vegetables to her neighbors. Karen is a Just Food board member and Just Food Trainer, leading workshops on food growing and food justice for community gardeners all over the city. Karen is a board member and former president of the New York City Community Garden Coalition, a group that was founded to preserve community gardens. She also co-founded Black Urban Growers (BUGS), an organization of volunteers committed to building networks and community support for growers in both urban and rural settings. In 2012 Ebony magazine voted her one of their 100 most influential African Americans in the country, and in 2014 she was awarded with the James Beard Leadership Award.
We will tour the Hydroponics system at New York Covenant Church after the lecture.
NYCC Hydroponics System

Hydroponics system at New York Covenant Church

[T]he issues that confront most Americans directly are income, food (thereby, agriculture), health and climate change. (And, of course, war, but let’s leave that aside for now.)

Mark Bittman

These are all related: You can’t address climate change without fixing agriculture, you can’t fix health without improving diet, you can’t improve diet without addressing income, and so on. The production, marketing and consumption of food is key to nearly everything. (It’s one of the keys to war, too, because large-scale agriculture is dependent on control of global land, oil, minerals and water.)

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Entrepreneurship as a Cure for Violence

Karen Washington speaking

Karen Washington is the co-founder of Rise & Root Farm in Orange County, NY, and a board member of the New York Botanical Gardens. She has spent decades promoting urban farming as a way for all New Yorkers to access to fresh, locally grown food.
Wednesday, June 1st at 6:30 pm
500 Main Church Street, New Rochelle, NY 10801
Karen Washington and Michelle Obama

Karen Washington, left, receives a 2010 National Medal for Museum and Library Service along with Gregory Long, director of the New York Botanical Garden, from First Lady Michelle Obama at the White House

As a member of the La Familia Verde Community Garden Coalition, she helped launched a City Farms Market, bringing garden fresh vegetables to her neighbors. Karen is a Just Food board member and Just Food Trainer, leading workshops on food growing and food justice for community gardeners all over the city. Karen is a board member and former president of the New York City Community Garden Coalition, a group that was founded to preserve community gardens. She also co-founded Black Urban Growers (BUGS), an organization of volunteers committed to building networks and community support for growers in both urban and rural settings. In 2012 Ebony magazine voted her one of their 100 most influential African Americans in the country, and in 2014 she was awarded with the James Beard Leadership Award.
We will tour the Hydroponics system at New York Covenant Church after the lecture.

Mark Bittman

[T]he issues that confront most Americans directly are income, food (thereby, agriculture), health and climate change. (And, of course, war, but let’s leave that aside for now.)
These are all related: You can’t address climate change without fixing agriculture, you can’t fix health without improving diet, you can’t improve diet without addressing income, and so on. The production, marketing and consumption of food is key to nearly everything. (It’s one of the keys to war, too, because large-scale agriculture is dependent on control of global land, oil, minerals and water.)
First Lady Michelle Obama agrees about the importance of growing food:

If you take into account prisoners, a large majority of African American men in some urban areas, like Chicago, have been labeled felons for life. These men are part of a growing undercaste — not class, caste – a group of people who are permanently relegated, by law, to an inferior second-class status. They can be denied the right to vote, automatically excluded from juries, and legally discriminated against in employment, housing, access to education, and public benefits — much as their grandparents and great-grandparents once were during the Jim Crow era.
~ Michelle Alexander

The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander

There is also a study that tracks murders in Newark, NY as an ‘infectious disease:’
Homicides in Newark have spread through the city over the past 30 years like an infectious disease and can be tracked and treated like a public health issue with prevention, inoculation and treatment, according to a study by Michigan State University.
The study, among the first to track murder through the lens of medical research, is part of a widening trend among local leaders and the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to treat violent crime like a medical condition.

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