AI Researcher and New Rochelle Native Professor Zachary Lipton

“Elon Musk doesn’t really deserve to have a voice in the public discourse about machine learning. He’s not an expert…”
Zachary LIpton

Professor Zachary Lipton, Assistant Professor in the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University.

Professor Zachary Lipton is an Assistant Professor in the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University, with an appointment in the Machine Learning Department. He recently completed four years of PhD studies at UC San Diego’s Artificial Intelligence Group.
His research interests are eclectic, spanning both methods, applications, and social impacts of machine learning (ML), there exist a few notable clusters. He is especially interested in modeling temporal dynamics and sequential structure in healthcare data, e.g., Learning to Diagnose. Additionally, he works on critical questions related to how we use ML in the wild, yielding The Mythos of Model Interpretability, and more recent work on the desirability and reconcilability of various statistical interpretations of fairness.
He is a native of New Rochelle, New York, attended Columbia University as an undergraduate, and is a jazz saxophonist.

Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Deep Learning

Terrance Jackson: What is the difference between artificial intelligence, machine learning, and deep learning?
Zachary Lipton: From the crazy way these topics are covered in the media, it can be hard to tell the meanings of the various terms. Often they are compared to each other, e.g. what deep learning can do vs what machine learning can do. The most faithful, simple way to put it is that they have a subset relationship. AI was a field long before people were interested in machine learning. It encompasses the study of how to do, with machines, all things that we think requires something like human intelligence. Of course that makes it a bit of a moving target. Once we know how to do something well, such as playing chess, then we sometimes don’t subsequently view it as a critical piece of AI.

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Pistis: Live The Resurrection!

Pistis understands that people often need financial help as well as spiritual help.

Pistis Card

All of history’s greatest figures achieved success by having pistis, “trust; commitment; loyalty; engagement.”
Coming soon
Pistis “Live The Resurrection!” T-shirts

Live The Resurrection

“Did not the Messiah have to suffer these things and then enter his glory?” And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, he explained to them what was said in all the Scriptures concerning himself.
~ Luke 24: 26-27
Our t-shirts are made with as many high-quality local inputs as possible.
Our t-shirts are:
  • Grown in the USA
  • Certified organic cotton
  • Made in the Carolinas
  • Transparent supply chain
  • Water-based inks
  • Environmentally-friendly print process
  • Medium weight: 5.4 oz
Be proud each and every day you wear your tee knowing that your purchase supports more than 500 American jobs! Since it’s made from super-comfortable ringspun cotton, you’ll want to wear it every day. And because it’s made from a medium weight (5.4 oz) fabric that’s constructed for durability, you can actually wear it every day without it showing signs of wear.
Don’t try to interpret faith
in terms of science and logic.
“And all things you ask in prayer, believing, you will receive.”
Matthew 21:22
Religious imagery is
telling you what is becoming.


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Interview with Literary Agent Dawn Michelle Hardy

Dawn Michelle Hardy has been called a “literary lobbyist” by Ebony magazine for her ability to help authors reach their readership using strategic promotions, win awards and garner national and local media attention. She has dual roles in the book publishing industry as both publicist and literary agent. She founded Dream Relations, PR & Literary Consulting Agency in 2004. Additionally, in 2011 she joined Serendipity Literary Agency where she aids in shaping the careers of platformed writers. Some of her clients at Serendipity include Jean McGianni Celestin, co-writer of the Nat Turner biopic The Birth of a Nation, Kent Babb, Washington Post sports writer and PEN Literary Award finalist for Not a Game: The Incredible Rise and Unthinkable Fall of Allen Iverson, Clay Cane, entertainment editor at BET.com, director of Holler If You Hear Me: Black and Gay in the Church, and author of Live Through This: Surviving the Intersections of Sexuality, God and Race.
As a publicist she works with both fiction and non-fiction authors including New York Times bestseller D. Watkins, author of The Beast Side: Living and Dying While Black in America, Tia Williams, former magazine beauty editor and author of The Perfect Find and Clint Smith award-winning poet, Ted Talk conference speaker and contributor to The New Yorker.

Not a Game

Terrance Jackson: What does a literary agent do?
Dawn Michelle Hardy: A literary agent represents their clients written work and champions for that work to be sold to a publisher. In most cases the work starts out as a book proposal for a non-fiction idea including a memoir or it can be a completed manuscript for a novel or children’s book. Additionally, as a literary agent I attend conferences and do critiques on book pitches and I conduct workshops on memoir writing, proposal writing and building an author platform.

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William “Billy” Thomas: Denzel Washington Mentor and Mount Vernon Legend

Billy Thomas Way

William “Billy” Thomas began working at the Mount Vernon Boys’ Club (MVBC) in 1955. Over the next 22 years he rose from athletic to program to camp and finally to Executive Director. In 1968, he was drafted into the United States Army and serve in Vietnam. Mr. Thomas also worked for over 20 years in the New Rochelle School District as a special education teacher.
ACBAW

From left, Saleem Sullivan, president of the board, curator Billy Thomas and treasurer Ennis Bennett at the center in Mount Vernon Jan. 3, 2017. (Photo: Tania Savayan/The Journal News)

Mr. Thomas is currently the curator of an exhibit at The  (AC-BAW) that marks the organization’s 40th year. The exhibit features gallery-sized commemorative U.S. Postal Service stamps that heralds the achievements of 173 African Americans.

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