AI Researcher and New Rochelle Native Professor Zachary Lipton

“Elon Musk doesn’t really deserve to have a voice in the public discourse about machine learning. He’s not an expert…”
Zachary LIpton

Professor Zachary Lipton, Assistant Professor in the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University.

Professor Zachary Lipton is an Assistant Professor in the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University, with an appointment in the Machine Learning Department. He recently completed four years of PhD studies at UC San Diego’s Artificial Intelligence Group.
His research interests are eclectic, spanning both methods, applications, and social impacts of machine learning (ML), there exist a few notable clusters. He is especially interested in modeling temporal dynamics and sequential structure in healthcare data, e.g., Learning to Diagnose. Additionally, he works on critical questions related to how we use ML in the wild, yielding The Mythos of Model Interpretability, and more recent work on the desirability and reconcilability of various statistical interpretations of fairness.
He is a native of New Rochelle, New York, attended Columbia University as an undergraduate, and is a jazz saxophonist.

Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Deep Learning

Terrance Jackson: What is the difference between artificial intelligence, machine learning, and deep learning?
Zachary Lipton: From the crazy way these topics are covered in the media, it can be hard to tell the meanings of the various terms. Often they are compared to each other, e.g. what deep learning can do vs what machine learning can do. The most faithful, simple way to put it is that they have a subset relationship. AI was a field long before people were interested in machine learning. It encompasses the study of how to do, with machines, all things that we think requires something like human intelligence. Of course that makes it a bit of a moving target. Once we know how to do something well, such as playing chess, then we sometimes don’t subsequently view it as a critical piece of AI.

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Interview with Trevor Koverko, CEO of Polymath

Security tokens will dominate the blockchain universe!
Trevor Koverko

Trevor Koverko, CEO of Polymath

Trevor Koverko is prominent blockchain founder, investor and speaker.
After launching his career at the convergence of Wall Street and Silicon Valley, Trevor became a very early leader in the blockchain community.
Trevor started in 2012 in Bitcoin, has keynoted major blockchain events like The North American Bitcoin Conference, and seeded foundation projects like Ethereum, Aion, QTum, Hive, EOS, and Shapeshift.
In 2017, after predicting the mega-trend of financial securities migrating to the blockchain, Trevor cofounded Polymath – the worlds largest securities token network.
Trevor graduated from Canada’s leading business school, Ivey, was a NHL draft pick of the New York Rangers and is a 4x attendee of Satoshi Roundtable.

Polymath logo

Terrance Jackson: What is Polymath?
Trevor Koverko: I founded Polymath in 2017 after wanting to launch a token of my own for a company I founded.
I quickly learned that the token I wanted to launch would actually be considered a security token — a token that would represent shares in my company. I also learned that the barrier to entry when it came to creating a security token was simply too high for many companies.
That’s when I had the idea for Polymath and to disrupt the legacy securities industry. Polymath, which is an open-source platform, gives issuers of financial products access to the blockchain, smart contracts, and token creation technology.
Polymath provides a protocol to ease issuers– such as venture capital firms, investment funds, and companies– through the complex tech and legal processes of a successful security token launch.
In short, the idea behind Polymath is an interface between financial securities and the blockchain.

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Can Google Predict the Stock Market

Can Google Predict the Stock Market
Using Artificial Intelligence to Analyze Financial Data
A Machine Learning Demonstration by
Terrance Jackson
Monday, May 21 @ 7 pm
Larchmont Public Library
121 Larchmont Avenue, Larchmont, NY
Can we use artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques on information collected by companies such as Google, Facebook, Wikipedia, and Twitter to help predict financial markets?


Based on the research of Tobias Preis, a professor of Behavioural Science & Finance at the Warwick Business School, using a trading strategy based on the changes of how often people Googled the word “debt,” yielded a return of 326% for the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA). This is compared to a 16% return for a buy and hold strategy.

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All Our Children Can Create

The Key to New York City’s Future is Education.

Terrance Jackson for Mayor of NYC

Democracy is based on citizens caring about and taking responsibility for both themselves as for the well-being of all.
Government is the instrument that citizens use to guarantee protection and empowerment for all. We all, together, provide what is needed for a decent life. Individual accomplishment rests on what other Americans have provided and keep providing.
Building the economy requires public investment — in public infrastructure, education, research, and much more.
Success is much more than money. It is your contribution to America as a whole — whether it is teaching, raising children, providing food, healing the sick, making useful products, guaranteeing our rights and our safety, or running businesses that make life better. America needs us all. And we all depend on each other.
America needs us all. And we all depend on each other.
The key to New York City’s future is education. And we can show fairly conclusively that all our children can create. The challenging part is that there is no magic moment of creation. Creators spend almost all their time creating, persevering despite doubt, failure, ridicule, and rejection until they succeed in making something new and useful. There are no tricks, shortcuts, or get-creative-quick schemes. The process is ordinary, even if the outcome is not.
Creating is not magic but work, and we must teach this to our children.

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New Tax Code Hits Westchester Hard

In 2016, Westchester County ranked first in the nation in property taxes. Westchester residents paid on average $16,500 a year in property taxes, according to a report from ATTOM Data Solutions. High taxes are undermining the Westchester economy. If you were a company trying to find a location for a new office or distribution center, why would you come to the highest taxed county in the United States?
Now, we have another problem. The GOP’s tax plan is likely to advantage wealthy Americans in a number of ways, including estate-tax, private-tuition benefits, and especially commercial real estate. Yet, where the housing market is concerned, proposed changes — particularly those in the House version of the bill — are set to disproportionately affect wealthier homeowners. According to an article in The New York Times:
The bill, if enacted into law, could send home prices tumbling 10 percent or more in parts of the New York area, according to one economic analysis. It could increase the regional tax burden, complicating companies’ efforts to attract skilled workers. It could make it harder for state and local governments to pay for upgrades to the transit system and other infrastructure. And it could force cuts in federal programs that help immigrants, the elderly and other low-income residents afford the region’s high cost of living.

SALT deductions

Westchester residents and Westchester home values could both take a big hit when the new tax bill is enacted. At present the differences between the House and Senate versions of the tax bill will be reconciled by a conference committee and then enacted into law, but both versions include provisions that will be costly to many Westchester residents.

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Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google Should be Broken Up


In Fast Company, Douglas Rushkoff wrote “It’s Time To Break Up Amazon:”
Whatever you may think of Jeff Bezos, and whether or not antitrust regulations can justifiably be applied to a company whose expansion doesn’t raise but actually lowers costs for end consumers, may be beside the point. Many of us get that something is amiss, but are ourselves so deeply enmeshed in the logic of last century’s version of free-market industrial capitalism that we can’t quite bring ourselves to call this out for the threat it poses to our markets, our economy, and even our planet….

Douglas Rushkoff

The problem is, when an existing market is merely a means to another end, the company doesn’t consider the long-term effects of its actions. Amazon treated the book industry the same way companies like Walmart once treated the territories into which they expanded: Use a war chest of capital to undercut prices, put competitors out of business, become the sole employer in the community, turn employees into part-time shift workers, lobby for deregulation, and effectively extract all the value from a given region before closing up shop and moving to the next one.

Fat Cats

This model of doing business—one that even a proto-fascist like Henry Ford would have considered obscene—has not served corporations well. As the data now reveals, corporate profits have been steadily decreasing relative to corporate size over the past 75 years…. And by sucking their customers and suppliers dry, such companies end up destroying the marketplaces on which they depend for revenue. It’s a form of financial obesity, where the only thing left for the company to do is acquire a new marketplace, extract all its value, and move on.

Scott Galloway

At Business Insider’s IGNITION conference, Scott Galloway gave a presentation on why “The Big Four” — Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google — should be broken up. Galloway is a professor of marketing at the NYU Stern School of Business and the author of “The Four: The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google.”

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Agency as a Cure for Violence

We are bringing Genius Farm
To Baltimore and Philadelphia

When it comes to technology skills, the U.S. comes in last place — right below Poland. In addition, there was a significant racial difference with non-whites scoring below whites.
That’s why we are introducing students to artificial intelligence (A.I.), computer vision, data science, machine learning, robotics and blockchain technology.
Tech’s biggest companies are placing huge bets on artificial intelligence (A.I.) where typical A.I. specialists can be paid from $300,000 to $500,000 a year or more in salary and company stock.
We must educate our children for the 21st Century

In 1990, there were 305 homicides in Baltimore and 2,262 homicides in New York City. In 2017, Baltimore is actually on track to surpass New York City in homicides. According to The Baltimore Sun:
New York, which has a population of 8.5 million, had 182 homicides as of Sept. 3, according to police department data. Baltimore, a city of less than 620,000, was already at 238 victims as of that date, records show.
On a per-capita basis, the cities aren’t anywhere near each other. Baltimore saw 50 killings per 100,000 people in 2016. New York had 3.9 killings per 100,000.
New York’s declines in the 1990s often were attributed to zero-tolerance policies and statistics-based policing, prompting Baltimore to adopt similar strategies. But New York in recent years also backed away from controversial stop-and-frisk tactics, and has continued to experience big declines.

The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander
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