EB-5 investment in New York

Chinese nationals, who often seek visas so that their children can receive an American education, account for a large percentage of EB-5 investors.
I recently connected with the VP of AI and Machine Learning at Unity Technologies, and we exchanged a couple of emails. This has led to our decision to having our students develop apps with the Unity game engine after building our chess-playing robot.
We are also working on having a group of students attend Unity Unite in Los Angeles in October.
On Thursday, November 15th @ 7 pm at the Larchmont Public Library, I will demo CHHE, an intelligent restaurant recommendation app and give a talk on applying artificial intelligence to local retail.
In addition, we are working on a Pokémon Go-type game called Ask, Seek, & Knock that will incorporate a new blockchain protocol called Avalanche.

Danny Lange

Yong Zhao
Yong Zhao books

Yong Zhao is a Foundation Distinguished Professor in the School of Education at the University of Kansas.
TJ: The EB-5 visa grants permanent U.S. residence to anyone investing a half million dollars in a U.S.-based development project. Eighty percent of EB-5 recipients are Chinese. According to a NPR report, Bryan Withall of Sino Outbound estimates that 70 to 80 percent of families are pursuing EB-5 visas for their children’s education. As “Wang” tells us:
I’m only doing this for my son’s education. He is in a good local school, but all they do is study for tests. The Chinese education system turns everyone into the same type of person.
Chinese students score higher than American students on international tests but many Chinese parents still want their children to be educated in the United States. Can you explain this?
YZ: I’ve written about this in various places, most extensively my book Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Dragon: Why China has the Best (and Worst) Education in the World. The simple answer to this paradox is that test scores are not good indicators of education quality. In fact attempts to pursue test scores can be counter productive, damaging what actually matters for success in life, such as confidence, creativity, and love of learning.

One of our students, Zaleik Walsh, speaks Mandarin and is currently on a month-long visit to China.

Zaleik and Julian programming the Raspberry Pi

The Key to New York’s Future is Education.
When it comes to technology skills, the U.S. comes in last place — right below Poland. In addition, there was a significant racial difference with non-whites scoring below whites.
That’s why we are introducing students to artificial intelligence (A.I.), computer vision, data science, machine learning, robotics and blockchain technology.
Tech’s biggest companies are placing huge bets on artificial intelligence (A.I.) where typical A.I. specialists can be paid from $300,000 to $500,000 a year or more in salary and company stock.
We must educate our children for the 21st Century
The best artists, scientists, engineers, inventors, entrepreneurs, and other creators are the ones who keep taking steps by finding new problems, new solutions, and then new problems again. The root is innovation is exactly the same as it was when our species was born: looking at something and thinking, “I can make this better.”
Creating is not magic but work, and we must teach this to our children.
The vast majority—98 percent—of teachers say creating is so important that it should be taught daily, but when tested, they nearly always favor less creative children over more creative children.
This is not restricted to schools, and it persists into adulthood. Decision makers and authority figures in business, science, and government all say they value creation, but when tested, they do not value creators.
WinCo Supermarket employee Cathy Burch, 42, here with her husband Kevin. In her 23 years at WinCo, she has worked a variety of front-line jobs including checker, shelf stocker, and inventory order.

Millionaire WinCo employee Cathy Burch

Most Americans in her situation have either no savings at all or an account such as a 401k containing less than $50,000, but…
Cathy owns almost a $1 million in stock.
Let’s build an abundance-based entrepreneurial ecosystem in New York City.
This vision is based in part on three books Startup Communities by Brad Feld, Local Dollars, Local Sense by Michael Shuman, and iGods by Craig Detweiler.

Terrance Jackson for Mayor of NYC

If we don’t want poverty in our community, our businesses must pay living wages with decent benefits. And if we don’t want polluted air, water, and land, our businesses must behave in environmentally sustainable ways.
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