Introducing New Rochelle Magazine

New Rochelle Magazine will be mailed to property owners with properties valued over $1 million, such as:
Gregory Hawkins
Sharon  Hawkins
20 Premium Point Rd
Rochelle, NY 10801
FULL MARKET VALUE
$3,290,210
Property Taxes 2016
School $72,354.81
City $20,085.58
County $16,694.10
Cyrus Noshir Pardiwala
Kimberly Willoc Pardiwala
27 Dogwood Ln
Larchmont, NY 10538
FULL MARKET VALUE
$1,101,399
Property Taxes 2016
School $24,220.79
City $6,879.99
County $5,588.36
Dr. Paula Rothaus
19 Pryor Manor Rd
Larchmont, NY 10538
FULL MARKET VALUE
$1,905,594
Property Taxes 2016
School $41,905.81
City $11,731.88
County $9,668.74
Donald Gallagher
Raymonde Gallagher
78 Seaview Ave
New Rochelle, NY 10801
FULL MARKET VALUE
$1,038,462
Property Taxes 2016
School $21,628.78
City $6,166.55
County $5,087.49
Reducing Property Taxes & Reforming Education
Why should the residents of New Rochelle pay extremely high property taxes to maintain a system that destroys the creativity of our children?
In 2016, Westchester County ranked first in the nation in property taxes. Westchester residents paid on average $16,500 a year in property taxes, according to a report from ATTOM Data Solutions. High taxes are undermining the Westchester economy. If you were a company trying to find a location for a new office or distribution center, why would you come to the highest taxed county in the United States?
We pay outrageous property taxes, yet our children are vastly underserved by schools. Our schools were designed in the late 19th Century and early 20th Century to create the cogs of the Industrial Age, jobs such as factory workers and bureaucrats. Schools do not value creativity and entrepreneurship, the types of skills that are needed in the 21st Century.

Click images for draft of New Rochelle Magazine Draft

New Rochelle Magazine
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What is Going On in the DRC?

Blood on Your Handset
Is your cellphone made with conflict minerals mined in the Congo? The industry doesn’t want you to know.

Gold miners form a human chain while digging an open pit at the Chudja mine near Kobu, Congo, in 2009. Civil conflict in Congo has been driven for more than a decade by the struggle for control over the country’s vast natural resources, including gold, diamonds, and timber. Photo by Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters

The Dodd-Frank Act, passed in 2010, is primarily known as the law that tries to tighten regulation of the financial services industry and improve aspects of corporate governance. It also requires companies to track and report the conflict minerals used in their products. These minerals are tantalum (used in cellphones, DVD players, laptops, hard drives, and gaming devices), tungsten, tin, and gold, if they are mined in the Democratic Republic of Congo and surrounding countries including Rwanda, where the mineral trade has fueled bloody conflicts.
Two months after the SEC acted, the NAM, along with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Business Roundtable, sued to try to stop the rule from taking effect. The trade groups argued that complying with the rule would be costly, that it is unclear whether Congolese people would benefit, and that the rule violates companies’ First Amendment rights by compelling them to speak. (Some big companies, including Microsoft, General Electric, and Motorola Solutions, have publicly opposed the business groups’ stance on the conflict minerals rule.)

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Otunba Michael Adenuga Jr

Mike Adenuga

Michael Adeniyi Agbolade Ishola Adenuga Jr (born 29 April 1953) is the second-richest person in Nigeria and built his fortune in telecom and oil production. His mobile phone network, Globacom, is the second largest operator in Nigeria with 36 million subscribers. It also has a presence in Ghana and Benin. He also owns stakes in the Equitorial Trust Bank and the oil exploration firm Conoil (formerly Consolidated Oil Company). As of August 15, 2017, Forbes has estimated his net worth at $5.3 billion.
His father, the Oloye Michael Agbolade Adenuga Sr, was a school teacher, his mother Juliana Oyindamola Adenuga (née Onashile of Okesopin, Ijebu Igbo) a businesswoman of royal Ijebu descent.
Adenuga received his secondary school education at the Ibadan Grammar School and Comprehensive High School in Aiyetoro. He graduated from Northwestern Oklahoma State University and obtain a MBA from Pace University in New York. He worked as a taxi driver to help fund his university education.

Glo Music
Glo Comedy

Creating the Company that Outperforms Google and Facebook

Random Collisions New York

Random Collisions are forums for the random collision of ideas. Jane Jacobs in The Economy of Cities offered the random collision of ideas as an explanation for the success of cities such as New York.
Random Collisions New York
Wednesday, June 6, 2018 & Thursday, June 7, 2018
Random Collisions Silicon Valley – September 2018
Random Collisions Los Angeles – January 2019
Random Collisions Lagos – Spring 2019
Random Collisions Bangalore – Fall 2019

Mark Zuckerberg in Africa

On Thursday, August 10th, I attended Tech Inclusion New York. This and a number of other random collisions inspired the idea of Random Collisions.

Tech Inclusion New York

“Millennials are on track to be the least entrepreneurial generation in recent history.”
American innovation may be suffering from the fact that Americans today have less exposure to ideas outside the realm of their own experience.
In The Economy of Cities, published in 1969, [Jane Jacobs] argued that the elements most scholars cited when trying to explain metropolitan success—access to natural resources, for example—obscured one monumentally important factor: the random collision of ideas.

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National Standards are the Wrong Bet: Interview with Professor Yong Zhao

Yong Zhao
Yong Zhao books

Yong Zhao is a Foundation Distinguished Professor in the School of Education at the University of Kansas. He is also a professorial fellow at the Mitchell Institute for Health and Education Policy, Victoria University in Australia. He previously served as the Presidential Chair and Director of the Institute for Global and Online Education in the College of Education, University of Oregon, where he was also a Professor in the Department of Educational Measurement, Policy, and Leadership. Visit his site at: zhaolearning.com.

Terrance Jackson: You begin your book, World Class Learners: Educating Creative and Entrepreneurial Students, writing about Suhas Gopinath, an entrepreneur who started a company at the age of 14. Why is this an important story about education?
Yong Zhao: It is important for three reasons. First, it says that young children, regardless of their background, can become great individuals with a global impact, thus education should focus on helping children achieve that potential. Second, it tells us current education is not helping young people like Suhas to become great individuals, as Suhas became what he became outside school or by not attending school. Third, Suhas represents what we need in the future–entrepreneurially-minded individuals who create jobs instead of employment-minded individuals who keep looking for jobs that may not exist.

TJ: In an 1995 interview, Steve Jobs said:
Life can be much broader once you discover one simple fact: Everything around you that you call life was made up by people that were no smarter than you and you can change it, you can influence it, you can build your own things that other people can use.
Once you learn that, you’ll never be the same again.
Would you like to comment on this quote?
YZ: Love this quote. I always believe that each and every child has the potential to be great. They do not walk into a life created by others, they are the creators of their own life. This is the point that I elaborate in my upcoming book Teach for Greatness.

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The Most Dangerous and Savage Group in the Country

The Paul Ryan Republicans, who in my view, are the most dangerous and savage group in the country are busy implementing programs that they have talking about quietly for years. Very savage programs which have very simple principles. One, make sure you offer to the rich and powerful gifts beyond the dreams of avarice and kick everyone else in the face. And it is going on step by step, just behind the bluster. …
Every cabinet official was chosen to destroy anything of human significance in that part of the government. It’s so systematic that it can’t be unplanned. I doubt that Trump planned it. …
Whoever is working on it, is doing a pretty effective job and the Democrats are cooperating, cooperating in a very striking way. Take a look at the focus in Congress. It’s on the few decent things that Trump has been doing. So maybe members of his transition team contacted the Russians. Is that a bad thing? …
Meanwhile the parts of the governmental structure that are beneficial to human beings and to future generations are being systematic destroyed and with very little attention.
~ Noam Chomsky

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