Can Hospitals and Health Systems Heal America’s Communities?

New York State largest private sector employers (in alphabetical order)
  • Columbia University
  • Home Depot
  • JPMorgan Chase Bank
  • Montefiore Hospital & Medical Center
  • Mount Sinai Hospital
  • North Shore-LIJ Health System
  • New York-Presbyterian University Hospital
  • University of Rochester
  • Walmart
  • Wegmans Food Markets
New York City largest private sector employers (in alphabetical order)
  • Columbia University
  • Consolidated Edison
  • JPMorgan Chase Bank
  • Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
  • Montefiore Hospital & Medical Center
  • Mount Sinai Hospital
  • New Partners Inc.
  • North Shore-LIJ Health System
  • New York-Presbyterian University Hospital
  • NYU Hospitals Center
4 out of 10 of the largest private sector employers in New York State and 7 out of 10 of the largest private sector employers in New York City are healthcare providers.

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Physicians, healthcare administrators, and hospital trustees face an important and historic leadership opportunity that our country and our communities desperately need. Hospitals and health systems throughout the country are beginning to build on their charitable efforts, beyond traditional corporate social responsibility, to adopt elements of an anchor mission in their business models and operations.
For most Americans, the term “healthcare” connotes accessing good quality doctors and getting treatment once ill, with a smattering of lifestyle actions that can be taken to try to prevent illness, such as exercise, diet, and supplements. Hospitals, many believe, exist to take care of sick people.
But in recent years, the healthcare sector has expanded its focus beyond illness treatment alone to what creates health in the first place, tackling the challenging social, economic, and environmental issues that, to a large extent, determine our health status, our outlook, and our life expectancy. These are the “social determinants of health,” a complex of factors related to where people are born, grow, work, live, and age. They represent the wider set of forces and systems shaping the conditions of daily life that drive health outcomes, such as inequality, social mobility, community stability, and the quality of civic life.
For over two decades, overwhelming evidence from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other sources suggests that social, economic, and environmental factors are more significant predictors of health than access to care. The University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute found that over 40 percent of the factors that contribute to the length and quality of life are social and economic; another 30 percent are health behaviors, directly shaped by socio-economic factors; and another 10 percent are related to the physical environment where we live and make day to day choices—again inextricably linked to social and economic realities. Just 10 to 20 percent of what creates health is related to access to care, and the quality of the services received.

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Harlem Magazine Because Digital Ads Suck & Google Is An Old Business

The new model of advertising and branding demands that companies improve public life and satisfy the needs of our higher sacred selves.

Harlem Magazine

Click the image above for a rough draft of Harlem Magazine.

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Ad Spending

Google has more revenue than all U.S. print newspapers and magazines combined.
Yet direct mail is still the biggest single direct marketing channel, worth around $45 billion a year in the US alone. But it’s increasingly clear that printed marketing communications work best when used in conjunction with digital channels such as email, personalized web pages (PURLs), database marketing, and mobile elements.

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