Reversing Diabetes, Unemployment & Climate Change

Karen Washington speaking

Karen Washington is the co-founder of Rise & Root Farm in Orange County, NY, and a board member of the New York Botanical Gardens. She has spent decades promoting urban farming as a way for all New Yorkers to access to fresh, locally grown food.
Building Communities Through Urban Agriculture
Wednesday, June 1st at 6:30 pm
500 Main Church Street, New Rochelle, NY 10801
Karen Washington and Michelle Obama

Karen Washington, left, receives a 2010 National Medal for Museum and Library Service along with Gregory Long, director of the New York Botanical Garden, from First Lady Michelle Obama at the White House

As a member of the La Familia Verde Community Garden Coalition, she helped launched a City Farms Market, bringing garden fresh vegetables to her neighbors. Karen is a Just Food board member and Just Food Trainer, leading workshops on food growing and food justice for community gardeners all over the city. Karen is a board member and former president of the New York City Community Garden Coalition, a group that was founded to preserve community gardens. She also co-founded Black Urban Growers (BUGS), an organization of volunteers committed to building networks and community support for growers in both urban and rural settings. In 2012 Ebony magazine voted her one of their 100 most influential African Americans in the country, and in 2014 she was awarded with the James Beard Leadership Award.
We will tour the Hydroponics system at New York Covenant Church after the lecture.
NYCC Hydroponics System

Hydroponics system at New York Covenant Church

[T]he issues that confront most Americans directly are income, food (thereby, agriculture), health and climate change. (And, of course, war, but let’s leave that aside for now.)

Mark Bittman

These are all related: You can’t address climate change without fixing agriculture, you can’t fix health without improving diet, you can’t improve diet without addressing income, and so on. The production, marketing and consumption of food is key to nearly everything. (It’s one of the keys to war, too, because large-scale agriculture is dependent on control of global land, oil, minerals and water.)

40% will develop diabetes

According to the CDC as reported by BloombergBusiness:
Forty percent of Americans born from 2000 to 2011 will develop diabetes, double the risk of those born a decade earlier….
More than half of all Hispanics and non-Hispanic black women born from 2000 to 2011 will develop diabetes in their lifetime.
In 2013, African Americans were twice as likely as non-Hispanic Whites to die from diabetes. This is according to the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health.
Yet…
Diabetes can be reversed with diet

Click here for full documentary.
Simply Raw: Reversing Diabetes in 30 Days

Simply Raw: Reversing Diabetes in 30 Days
http://www.rawfor30days.com/

At the northern outskirts of Milwaukee, stand 14 greenhouses on two acres of land. This is Growing Power, the only land within the Milwaukee city limits zoned as farmland. Founded by MacArthur Foundation “genius” fellow Will Allen, Growing Power is an active farm producing tons of food each year, a food distribution hub, and a training center. Will Allen is the author of The Good Food Revolution.
Will Allen of Growing Power

Will Allen of Growing Power

According to Will Allen’s The Good Food Revolution:
The history of agriculture in the United States is largely a history of racial exploitation. From the slavery that formed the rural economy of the South to the mistreatment of migrant farm workers that continues to this day, our food has too often been made possible by someone else’s suffering. And that someone else tends not to be white….
The great tragedy for many African Americans…is that in losing touch with the land and with traditions handed down for generations, they also lost an important set of skills: how to grow and prepare healthy food….
It’s no coincidence that the epidemic of diet-related illnesses now sweeping the country—obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, strokes—are harming blacks the most….
America’s current agricultural system was hardly created by free market forces. Between 1995 and 2010, American farmers received about $262 billion in federal subsidies. And the wealthiest 10 percent of farmers received 74 percent of those subsidies. Almost two-thirds of American farmers didn’t receive any subsidies at all….
One in two African Americans born in the year 2000 is expected to develop type II diabetes. Four out of every ten African American men and women over the age of twenty have high blood pressure….
The farmer became less important than the food scientist, the distributor, the marketer, and the corporation. In 1974, farmers took home 32 cents of every dollar spent on food in the United States. Today, they get only 16 cents.
Will Allen and President Obama

President Barack Obama greets guest Will Allen in a receiving line in the Blue Room of the White House, May 19, 2010. (Official White House Photo by Samantha Appleton)

In 1920 African-Americans made up 14 percent of all the farmers in the nation and worked 16 million acres of land. In 2012, African-Americans farmers were 1.4 percent of the country’s 3.2 million farmers, and worked 3.2 million acres of land. African-American sales represented 0.2 percent of total U.S. agriculture sales, and African-American-operated farmland accounted for 0.4 percent of U.S. farmland.
African Americans in losing touch with the land and with traditions handed down for generations, they also lost an important set of skills: how to grow and prepare healthy food.
Will Allen and Michelle Obama

Snapshot of Will Allen and first lady Michelle Obama during his visit to the White House. (White House Photo)

First Lady Michelle Obama agrees about the importance of growing food:

Small-scale farmers cool the planet

Getting in touch with the land can also help us fight climate change. Consider that compared to large-scale industrial farms, small-scale agroecological farms not only use fewer fossil fuel-based fertilizer inputs and emit less Greenhouse gases (GHGs), including methane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide (CO2), but they also have the potential to actually reverse climate change by sequestering CO2 from the air into the soil year after year. According to the Rodale Institute, small-scale farmers and pastoralists could sequester more than 100% of current annual CO2 emissions with a switch to widely available, safe and inexpensive agroecological management practices that emphasize diversity, traditional knowledge, agroforestry, landscape complexity, and water and soil management techniques, including cover cropping, composting and water harvesting.

Small-scale farmers

Importantly, agroecology can not only sequester upwards of 7,000 pounds of CO2 per acre per year, but it can actually boosts crop yields. In fact, recent studies by GRAIN (www.grain.org) demonstrate that small-scale farmers already feed the majority of the world with less than a quarter of all farmland. Addressing climate change on the farm can not only tackle the challenging task of agriculture-generated GHGs, but it can also produce more food with fewer fossil fuels. In other words, as the ETC Group (www.etcgroup.org) has highlighted, industrial agriculture uses 70% of the world’s agricultural resources to produce just 30% of the global food supply, while small-scale farmers provide 70% of the global food supply while using only 30% of agricultural resources.

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