Terrance Jackson for Congress

The law needs legitimacy in domestic & foreign policies.
New York’s 13th Congressional District

tj 4 congress intl

When the law is applied in the absence of legitimacy, it does not produce obedience. It produces the opposite. It leads to backlash.

Terrance Jackson for Congress
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Putting It All TogetherIn 1991, Terrance Jackson wrote Putting It All Together addressing mass incarceration as government policy. He endured people calling him crazy and an “conspiracy theorist.” 24 years later, mass incarceration as government policy is common knowledge. We need representation that will be proactive and not reactive.

Ed Burns

It’s not a war on drugs. Don’t ever think it’s a war on drugs. It’s a war on the Blacks. It started as a war on the Blacks, it’s now spread to Hispanics and poor Whites. But initially it was a war on Blacks. And it was designed basically to take that energy that was coming out of the Civil Rights Movement and destroy it.
~ Ed Burns
Co-creator of “The Wire”

HSBC

According to an article by Avinash Tharoor, Bank of America, Western Union, and JP Morgan, are among the institutions allegedly involved in the drug trade. Meanwhile, HSBC has admitted its laundering role, and evaded criminal prosecution by paying a fine of almost $2 billion. The lack of imprisonment of any bankers involved is indicative of the hypocritical nature of the drug war; an individual selling a few grams of drugs can face decades in prison, while a group of people that tacitly allow — and profit from — the trade of tons, escape incarceration.
According to the Corporate Crime Reporter:
Corporate crime inflicts far more damage on society than all street crime combined.Whether in bodies or injuries or dollars lost, corporate crime and violence wins by a landslide.
The FBI estimates, for example, that burglary and robbery – street crimes – costs the nation $3.8 billion a year.
The losses from a handful of major corporate frauds – Tyco, Adelphia, Worldcom, Enron – swamp the losses from all street robberies and burglaries combined.
Health care fraud alone costs Americans $100 billion to $400 billion a year.
The savings and loan fraud – which former Attorney General Dick Thornburgh called “the biggest white collar swindle in history” – cost us anywhere from $300 billion to $500 billion.
David Simon

David Simon, co-creator of HBO’s “The Wire”

The factories are not going to be here anymore. We don’t need these people so the least we can do is hunt them. And when we hurt them we at least provide jobs for cops, DEA agents, lawyers and prison guards.
~ David Simon
Co-creator of HBO’s The Wire

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New Ro Magazine

The new model of advertising and branding demands that companies improve public life and satisfy the needs of our higher sacred selves.

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Click the above image for a
Rough draft of New Ro Magazine.
New Ro Magazine [New Ro is short for New Rochelle, NY] is a free community magazine that will combine print, video, and digital while understanding the human element. It’s increasingly clear that printed marketing communications work best when used in conjunction with digital channels such as email, personalized web pages (PURLs), database marketing, and mobile elements.
New Ro Magazine will address the fact that the standard research techniques of corporate America are cheating us of many great experiences. Malcolm Gladwell describes this as the “Kenna problem:”
If I ask you why you think what you think, can I trust your answer?
This process [standard market research] is fundamentally flawed. It is completely screwed. We totally overrate the significance of what we find out when we go through this kind of formal process and the consequence of that overreliance on this system is that we are cheating ourselves of all kinds of wonderful experiences that we would otherwise have [such as Kenna].
Michelle Obama Hosts Farm-To-Table Lunch For Spouses Of World Leaders

POCANTICO HILL, NY – SEPTEMBER 24: U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama, Colombian First Lady Maria Clemencia Rodriguez De Santos (2nd R), Haitian First Lady Elisabeth D. Preval (R), and Executive Chef of Blue Hill restaurant Dan Barber (4th R) talk with students from JFK Magnet School and Pocantico Hills Central School at Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture on September 24, 2010 in Pocantico Hills, Westchester county, New York. The visit is part of the First Lady’s healthy eating program. (Photo by Hiroko Masuike/Getty Images)

It’s Criminal To Allow Aramark To Feed Our Children

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The Music Revolution and the Digital Divide

The Music Revolution

The Music Revolution will also address the digital divide
The “digital divide” is the inequality between those who can reliably connect to the Internet and computers and those who cannot. At one Newark public high school, accessible Wi-Fi can be more valuable than a bus ride home.
In Newark, a city with one of the highest poverty rates in the U.S., many Newark Leadership Academy students can’t afford home Internet access. At the school, like all public schools in the city, Wi-Fi isn’t available to teachers or students. In fact, only 39 percent of public schools have wireless network access for the whole school. Instead, teens hungry for an online connection seek alternatives in order to fill out job and college applications, complete homework assignments and stay connected to the outside world.
Many of students would prefer a two-mile walk home over a missed Wi-Fi opportunity.
According to a study conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, only 54 percent of households with incomes of less than $30,000 have a high-speed broadband connection at home. As a result, in order to complete digital assignments, many students are forced to find sources of free Internet access outside of school. While the library is often an option, hours can be limited, particularly in the evening. Many of these students are increasingly turning to free WiFi at places like McDonald’s to complete their homework.

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Wall Street and Government Policy is Killing the Music Industry

The Music Revolution

The sky was all purple
There were people runnin’ everywhere
Tryin’ to run from their destruction
You know I didn’t even care
They say two thousand zero, zero
Party over
Oops, out of time
So tonight I’m gonna party like it’s 1999
In 1999 worldwide music revenue was $27 billion, in 2014 it had dropped to $15 billion. Most blame Napster for this decline, but if you dig deeper you will find that Wall Street and government policy are the actual cause of this steep decline in music revenue.
Bob Marley and Chris Blackwell

(Left to Right) Junior Murvin, Bob Marley, Jacob Miller, and Chris Blackwell

Corporate culture is not conducive to developing musical talent. Chris Blackwell, founder of Island Record, quoted in The Song Machine by John Seabrook:
I don’t think the music business lends itself very well to being a Wall Street business. You’re always working with individuals, with creative people, and the people your are trying to reach, by and large, don’t view music as a commodity but as a relationship with a band. It takes time to expand that relationship, but most people who work for the corporations have three-year contracts, some five, and most of them are expected to produce. What an artist really needs is a champion, not a numbers guy who in another year is going to leave.

Adele

Adele’s new album, 25, sold 3.38 million copies in its debut week and another 1.1 million copies in its second week. It has smashed the single-week US album sales record, previously held by 90s boyband ★NSYNC. It has become the best-selling release of 2015, bypassing Taylor Swift’s 1989. It is also the first LP ever to sell over 1 million copies in its second week after accomplishing that feat in its first.

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